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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: Morphological forms of Balamuthia mandrillaris. Above – (a) Interference-contrast light micrograph of a trophozoite in culture. Numerous pseudopods radiate from the ameba which helps in locomotion. Bar indicates 5 μm (Courtesy – Ref. 2). (b) Transmission electron micrograph of the cyst reveals a thin, wavy ectocyst, a fibrous mesocyst, and a thick, round, electron-dense endocyst. Magnification, ×7500 (Courtesy – Ref. 1). Below – When observed under a phase-contrast microscope, two distinct forms of the ameba can be observed. Under unfavorable conditions, the trophozoites change to cysts that appear as double-walled, circular structures under optical microscopy with a distinct nucleus and one or more nucleoli. On returning the conditions to normal, the cysts revert to the trophozoite forms. Bars indicate 10 μm (Courtesy – Ref. 31)

Figure 1: Morphological forms of <i>Balamuthia mandrillaris</i>. Above – (a) Interference-contrast light micrograph of a trophozoite in culture. Numerous pseudopods radiate from the ameba which helps in locomotion. Bar indicates 5 μm (Courtesy – Ref. 2). (b) Transmission electron micrograph of the cyst reveals a thin, wavy ectocyst, a fibrous mesocyst, and a thick, round, electron-dense endocyst. Magnification, ×7500 (Courtesy – Ref. 1). Below – When observed under a phase-contrast microscope, two distinct forms of the ameba can be observed. Under unfavorable conditions, the trophozoites change to cysts that appear as double-walled, circular structures under optical microscopy with a distinct nucleus and one or more nucleoli. On returning the conditions to normal, the cysts revert to the trophozoite forms. Bars indicate 10 μm (Courtesy – Ref. 31)